Key Data and Sources

How to Use This Page

Learn more about the key data, status, and sources that were used for the following health focus areas:

 

Diabetes

Status of diabetes data collection, sharing, and access:

There is need for an effective statewide data system that analyzes, interprets, and reports on -

  1. Risk for diabetes.
  2. Magnitude and burden of diabetes.
  3. Care practices to prevent and manage diabetes.
  4. Health outcomes.

Current diabetes data sources include self-report surveys, the U.S. Renal Data System, information on hospital inpatients, birth and death certificates. On a more intermittent basis special analyses are done using data from managed care, Medicare, and Medicaid for monitoring diabetes.

Limited resources, competing priorities, and issues of data privacy are common challenges to diabetes data collection, sharing and access.

  • Diagnosed diabetes source: Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data; self-reported.
  • Diabetes deaths source: Washington State Death Certificate data.
  • Diabetes hospitalizations source: Washington Hospital Discharge Data, Comprehensive Hospitalization Abstract Reporting System (CHARS), and Oregon State Hospital Discharge Data.
  • Diabetes costs source: American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care 2013; 36(4):1033-46.
  • Pre-diabetes (percent of adults with pre-diabetes ages 20 years and older) source: National Health and Nutrition Exam Survey (NHANES); applied to Washington State population estimates in 2014 for this age group.

 

Obesity

Status of obesity data collection, sharing, and access:

Currently, population data on obesity is collected for young children. About 50% of all infants born are served by the WIC program, this population is a lower income population and therefore is probably at higher risk of obesity.  

Data for adults and teens is self-reported, so has limitations. Adult data comes from a BRFSS national survey, and therefore it is difficult or impossible to determine significant differences in sub-populations at the local level.

  • In 2014, about 27% of adults were obese. Source: Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), self-reported height and weight.
  • In 2014, about 11% of 10th graders were obese, and 24% were overweight. Source: Healthy Youth Survey, self-reported height and weight.
  • In 2014, about 10% of children served by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) were obese. Source: WIC, measured height and weight.

From 2012–2014

25% of Washington women who gave birth were obese prior to pregnancy, including 5% of women who were morbidly obese.

45% of women who gave birth gained more weight during pregnancy than recommended, with higher rates in overweight or obese women (52%) compared with women not overweight or obese (44%). Source: Washington State birth certificate data

 

Tobacco

Tobacco use prevalence and harm is hidden by the lack of data for some populations. A lack of data does not mean that disparities do not exist. Some limitations of general population surveys and risk factor surveillance systems include:

  • Exclusion of specific groups of people
  • Small communities
  • Grouping of diverse populations
  • Reliance on self-reported data

An example of the disparities not captured by general population surveys includes high smoking rates among Asian American communities. The Washington State Department of Health recently solicited and received feedback from community partners on potential improvements to the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and Healthy Youth Survey (HYS) and is assessing the feasibility of including questions on Asian ethnic origin in both of these surveys.

Data monitoring is also a critical issue for LGBT communities. In 2014, Washington State’s HYS added sexual orientation as a demographic variable.

 

Tobacco use

  • Adult smoking rate (2012-2014): 16.2%
  • 10th grade smoking rate: 8%
  • 10th grade overall use of products that contain nicotine remains high due to increases in electronic cigarettes and vapor products

 

Health burden

  • One-in-five WA deaths: Including secondhand smoke, cigarettes cause 17-19% of deaths in Washington State per year
  • 8,300 Washington residents die from smoking each year
  • 3,900 Washington youth (under 18) become daily smokers each year
  • 104,000 Washington youth alive today will ultimately die prematurely from smoking

 

Economic Burden

  • $2.8 billion in annual economic costs directly caused by smoking

 

Sources Used:

 

Well-Child Visits

General population (specific age ranges):

Indicator Percent
(WA State)
Percent (US) Year
  • Childhood Immunizations: % of children 19-35 months who received recommended vaccines for 4:3:1:4:3:1:4
67.4 71.6 2014
  • Developmental Screening: % of children 10 months to 5 years with standardized developmental screening
29.9 30.8 2011-12

 

Medicaid-population (specific age ranges):

Indicator Percent
(WA State)

Percent (County range)

Year
  • Well-Child Visits age 3-6: The percentage of members 3-6 years of age who received one or more well-child visits with a PCP during year
62% 48% to 70% 2015
  • Child Access to Primary Care-25 months-6 years: The percentage of members 25 months-6 years of age who had a visit with a PCP in the year
86% 77% to 94% 2015

 

General population with stratification where possible (specific age ranges)

  • One or more personal doctors/nurse

Children with one or more health professionals considered by parents to be their child's personal doctor or nurse:

Age range WA State US Year
0-5 years of age 94.8% 91.3% 2011-12
0-17 years of age 91.2% 90.3% 2011-12

 

One or more personal doctors/nurse ages 0-17 years old:

Race/

ethnicity

Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic Other, non-Hispanic Year
  91.0% 92.4% Limited data 94.3% 2011-12

 

Household income levels within Federal Poverty Level (FPL) percentages:

Household income level 0-99% FPL

100-199% FPL

200-399% FPL 400%+ FPL Year
  88.6% 88.0% 90.3% 95.6% 2011-12

 

Urban/Rural residence Urban Rural Year
  91.8% 89.4% 2011-12

 

  • Children who receive coordinated, ongoing, comprehensive care within a medical home

 

Children whose health care meets Medical Home criteria:

Age range WA State US Year
0-5 years of age 65.6% 58.2% 2011-12

0-17 years of age

58.6% 54.4% 2011-12

 

Children who receive coordinated, ongoing, comprehensive care within a medical home, ages 0-17 years old:

Race/

ethnicity

Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic Other, non-Hispanic Year
  44.6% 64.7% Limited data 59.3% 2011-12

 

Household income levels within Federal Poverty Level (FPL) percentages:

Household income level 0-99% FPL

100-199% FPL

200-399% FPL 400%+ FPL Year
  45.4% 58.1% 58.4% 66.8% 2011-12

 

Urban/Rural residence Urban Rural Year
  60.6% 52.6% 2011-12

 

Source: Data were compiled from the National Survey of Children’s Health, the National Immunization Survey, and the Washington Health Care Authority (Medicaid data).

 

More Resources Available

Current Work and Initiatives

Emerging Issues

Health Equity Concerns

Recommended Strategies

 

Contact Us

Contact us at P4IPH@doh.wa.gov.