Evidence

Cognitive Behavioral Techniques for Psychosis

UW Medicine: High-Yield Cognitive Behavioral Techniques for Psychosis

Join us in a two-day workshop for psychiatric care providers to learn about the empirical support of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis (CBTp) as well as skills and strategies to better engage clients experiencing psychosis. This workshop will be facilitated by CBTp expert Dr. Sarah Kopelovich, PhD and co-facilitated by Dr. Jessica Maura, PhD. CME will be provided!

Diabetes

Diabetes

Common, serious, and costly in Washington State, diabetes is a complex condition related to harmful blood glucose levels. It is the leading cause of deaths in our state and a contributing factor to serious health outcomes such as amputations or blindness. Learn more from the Population Health Guide about current work and emerging issues.

The Population Health Guide provides information, tools and resources to promote population health initiatives in Washington State.

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

    ACEs

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) refers to traumatic events experienced in childhood that impact health over the lifespan. These include physical, emotional and sexual abuse, neglect, and/or family dysfunction. Learn more from the Population Health Guide about Specific ACEs linked to negative health outcomes in adulthood, including: experiencing homelessness, community violence, discrimination, and deportation or migration.

    Collaborative Care for Chronic Pain

    Collaborative Care for Chronic Pain

    Report and Recommendations from the Bree Collaborative

    Treatment of pain varies widely between systems and clinicians with high financial and human cost. Moving to a collaborative or team-based approach to managing complex pain has been shown to result in better patient outcomes. However, most approaches to pain management including chronic opioid therapy involved siloed health care providers. This workgroup met from January 2018 to January 2019 and defined minimum standards for:

    Communication Skills for Clinicians

    Communication Skills for Clinicians

    Research through a National Institute of Health Grant proved that “communication skills for serious illness are learnable.” Vital Talk  is a Seattle, nationally known 501(3) C) that disseminates that research. Vital Talks clearly states, “We believe every clinician can become a better communicator.”

    Opioid Response Network

    Opioid Response Network

    Providing education and training at a local level for evidence-based practices in the prevention, treatment and recovery of opioid use disorders, the State Targeted Response Technical Assistance Consortium (STR-TA), funded by SAMHSA, is a response from a large coalition of national professional organizations. The Opioid Response Network, ORN, provides local training and education free of charge for specific needs at a community level. 

    Supporting Patients With Depression

    Supporting Patients With Depression

    The Supporting Patients With Depression tip sheet  provides information to providers to support patients with with depression who are prescribed antidepressants with support supplementation. It was created in collaboration with the five MCOs in Washington, the Health Care Authority, Department of Health, Bastyr and Consejo Counseling. 

    The resource presents evidence regarding the association of nutritional support for mental health treatments, and is an important aid for providers serving these patients.

    MeHAF blank

    MeHAF

    The MeHAF is a widely used measure of behavioral health integration that can be used for initial assessment and to follow changes in levels of integration. It is easy to use and makes sense for a range of clinical settings - both primary care and community mental health.

    Fever: The body's way of fighting sickness

    The fever materials offer guidance to providers who wish to support health literacy with their clients. Parents are often alarmed when a child presents with pyrexia and the gamut of available resources, from well-intentioned friends or family members to a wide range or media streams, often are misguided and lack evidence-based solutions. We know that when patients understand basic health information, they are more likely to come to appropriate health decisions.

    Doctor's Office vs. Emergency Room

    Doctor's Office vs. Emergency Room

    The Doctor's Office Vs. Emergency Room material offers guidance to providers who wish to support health literacy with their clients. The handouts (also available in Spanish, Vietnamese, Somali and Russian) can be printed and distributed to clients as part of a conversation on when to take a child to the doctor’s office or the emergency room.