Opioid Use

Addressing the opioid use public health crisis 

Opioid Use Disorder

At epidemic levels in Washington State and across the country, opioid use disorder is a public health issue impacting state and local government, communities, health systems and, most importantly, individuals and families. 

In response to 694 deaths due to opioid overdose in Washington in 2016, Governor Inslee issued Executive Order 16-09, directing state agencies to implement an opioid response plan to:

Collaborative Care for Chronic Pain

Collaborative Care for Chronic Pain

Report and Recommendations from the Bree Collaborative

Treatment of pain varies widely between systems and clinicians with high financial and human cost. Moving to a collaborative or team-based approach to managing complex pain has been shown to result in better patient outcomes. However, most approaches to pain management including chronic opioid therapy involved siloed health care providers. This workgroup met from January 2018 to January 2019 and defined minimum standards for:

Opioid Response Network

Opioid Response Network

Providing education and training at a local level for evidence-based practices in the prevention, treatment and recovery of opioid use disorders, the State Targeted Response Technical Assistance Consortium (STR-TA), funded by SAMHSA, is a response from a large coalition of national professional organizations. The Opioid Response Network, ORN, provides local training and education free of charge for specific needs at a community level. 

Six Building Blocks

A Team-Based Approach to Improving Opioid Management in Primary Care

This website introduces the Six Building Blocks, provides tools and resources for improving care, and offers implementation guidance. The Six Building Blocks can help anyone who is interested in improving the care of patients using long-term opioid therapy.

Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Consent

Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Consent

In April 2019, Washington State, Health Care Authority released a guidance document for statewide use, related to Part 2 of 42CFR. 

SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit - 2018

The SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit - 2018

The SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit - 2018 equips health care providers, communities, and local governments with material to develop practices and policies to help prevent opioid-related overdoses and deaths. It addresses issues for health care providers, first responders, treatment providers, and those recovering from opioid overdose.

Webinar, Operationalizing Rapid Access: Buprenorphine Pathways Program at PHSKC

Webinar, Operationalizing Rapid Access: Buprenorphine Pathways Program at PHSKC

You are invited to an upcoming webinar, Operationalizing Rapid Access: Buprenorphine Pathways Program at PHSKC. Join Pat Kennedy LICSW, Program Manager at Public Health – Seattle & King County and one of the clinical care team members at Buprenorphine Pathways as they provide information about program operations, staffing model, financing strategies, and their treatment philosophy.

CDC Online Training Program for Opioid Prescribing

CDC Online Training Program for Opioid Prescribing

More than 40 people die every day from prescription opioid-involved overdose. The CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain provides recommendations for safer and more effective prescribing of opioids for chronic pain in patients 18 and older in outpatient settings outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care.

CALCULATING TOTAL DAILY DOSE OF OPIOIDS FOR SAFER DOSAGE

Higher dosages of opioids are associated with higher risk of overdose and death—even relatively
low dosages (20-50 morphine milligram equivalents (MME) per day) increase risk. Higher dosages
haven’t been shown to reduce pain over the long term. One randomized trial found no difference
in pain or function between a more liberal opioid dose escalation strategy (with average final
dosage 52 MME) and maintenance of current dosage (average final dosage 40 MME).