Collaborative Care for Opioid and Alcohol Use Disorders in Primary Care The SUMMIT Randomized Clinical Trial

Resource summary

Collaborative Care for Opioid and Alcohol Use

Key Points

Question:  Does collaborative care for opioid and alcohol use disorders increase treatment use and self-reported abstinence compared with usual primary care?

Findings:  Results from this randomized clinical trial found that, relative to usual care, the collaborative care intervention increased both the proportion of primary care patients receiving evidence-based treatment for opioid and alcohol use disorders and the number achieving abstinence from opioids or alcohol use at 6 months.

Meaning:  Effective treatment for opioid and alcohol use disorders can be integrated into primary care using a collaborative care intervention and results in improved patient outcomes.

Audience
Care Managers
Executives
Nurses
Operations
Practice Manager
Primary Care Provider (Physician, ARNP, or PA)
Psychologist/Mental Health/Psychiatrists
Quality Improvement Managers
Regional Connectors
Social Workers
Support Staff
Practice Type
Behavioral Health
Primary Care
Resource type
Evidence
Tools
Authors
Katherine E. Watkins, MD, MSHS1; Allison J. Ober, PhD1; Karen Lamp, MD2; et al
Sponsoring organization
JAMA
Policy and Reference