Resources

 

Search Filters

Health / Wellness Topics

Showing all resources.

Enter search text above or select a category on the left to refine the results.

18 resources match your criteria.

The CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain provides recommendations for safer and more effective prescribing of opioids for chronic pain in patients 18 and older in outpatient settings outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care. This online training series aims to help you apply CDC’s recommendations in your clinical setting through interactive patient scenarios, videos, knowledge checks, tips, and resources.
Report and Recommendations from the Bree Collaborative Treatment of pain varies widely between systems and clinicians with high financial and human cost. Moving to a collaborative or team-based approach to managing complex pain has been shown to result in better patient outcomes. However, most approaches to pain management including chronic opioid therapy involved siloed health care providers. This workgroup met from January 2018 to January 2019 and defined minimum standards for:
Collaborative Care for Opioid and Alcohol Use Key Points Question:  Does collaborative care for opioid and alcohol use disorders increase treatment use and self-reported abstinence compared with usual primary care?
Collaborative care has a way of stretching the skill sets of all involved. Over the past few years, we have come to realize the importance of treating not only common mental disorders but also addiction problems in primary care. Mark Duncan, M.D., shares his experience treating patients with substance use disorders in a collaborative care model and shows us that leveraging the strengths of collaborative care for addiction treatment has much promise. —Jürgen Unützer, M.D., M.P.H.
New Opioid Pain Management Guide Recommends Telehealth Patient Care Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, primary care physicians should provide opioid therapy for their patients through telehealth visits using two-way video such as Skype or FaceTime, or by telephone, according to a new guide issued by the AHRQ-funded Six Building Blocks program. 
The environmental scan demonstrates that, while offering MAT services in rural primary care settings may appear complex, many primary care providers view it as the treatment and "long-term management" of a chronic recurring disorder. Thus, in many ways, it is similar to the treatment they already provide for patients with asthma, diabetes, hypertension, and other chronic health conditions.
A variety of tools and resources are available for providers and patients who offer or use medication-assisted treatment (MAT) services. As part of this environmental scan, a list of tools has been assembled for use in the implementation of MAT. Although the tools were not all created specifically for rural primary care practices, they are potentially useful in those and other settings. The tools and resources found by this environmental scan are listed and described in the tables that follow. They come from a variety of public and private sources.
 A number of MAT models of care have been developed and implemented in primary care settings. Research is needed to clarify optimal MAT models of care and to understand effective strategies for overcoming barriers to implementation. The models of care presented in this technical brief may help inform the individualized implementation or MAT models of care in different primary care settings.
1-844-520-PAIN (7246) UW Medicine pain pharmacists and physicians are available Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (excluding holidays) to provide clinical advice at no charge to you. Consultations for clinicians treating patients with complex pain medication regimens, particularly high dose opioids. Keywords: Psychiatry, Treatment, Mental, Team, Collaborative, Primary, Integration, Behavioral, Care, Health, Opioid
If you’ve had an injury, surgery or major dental work, you are likely to have pain. Pain is a normal part of life and healing. Talk with your doctor about how you can get the most effective pain relief with the least risk. NON-OPIOID PAIN TREATMENTS HAVE FEWER RISKS For pain that will likely be gone in a week or two, it is always best to start with non-opioid pain treatments. Opioids may help control pain at first, but they are usually not necessary. Consider other options that may work just as well but have far fewer risks.